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to shirley from palm beach florida. surely come thanks for joining us on the "washington journal". >> caller: good morning. i worked in mental health services around 20 years after it raised my family and myself. twenty years of that was then ejected. in the hospitals. i suffer from depression. and i found that i have allergies. there is a book and he talks about how allergies can affect us so severely that it can cause things like depression, retardation, epilepsy and many physical ailments as well. hypertension and hyperglycemia and etc. and it is hard and people look at me like i'm crazy. and i say, look at your diet. many people believe that schizophrenia can be cured by diet? >> host: congressman? >> guest: there are a lot of things that go into this. you people have food reactions and supplements that can affect them? yes. as a cause of schizophrenia, i don't know. i don't want people to think that if only i change my diet, it will go away. there are a lot of other issues there. there are genetic issues, environmental issues, many other aspects here. working with this for 35 years, wor
and i'll fix that. if there are improvements come a senator that you to suggest, please let us know that the insurance is required and important because the federal government is helping to fill the gap, hope to file quickly ended at the good sometimes insurance proceeds can be slow and frankly some insurance come and is there better than others about honoring the contracts they have with these businesses and that's another important oversight that i hope the committee jurisdictions, which is not this committee, can provide in this recovery. are there any other questions because i'd like to be to the second panel and give them an opportunity. anything else you will want to add quick >> no, ma'am, thank you. >> we been hit with the $60 billion request -- did that come to the white house? >> it did. the white house and appropriations committee has reviewed it. >> were part of that is attributable to her within this committee's jurisdiction. does anybody have an idea? [inaudible] [inaudible] >> -- 40 million for the economic initiatives who discuss and 10 million for the ig. >> how muc
forces in there in the street using politics and the ballot box. the point i was trying to stress, may last point is the u.s. writ large, the government and also civil society organization and others are largely standing on the sideline here. bob's organization put out an excellent report last week people should look at my organization. usip data private study. right now u.s. policy, also civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here or there was a desire among local forces including younger islamists who want to bring about changes in their political movement in for the large purse sitting on the sidelines here we need to do more. >> we need to move on to the q&a portion here. a few questions from the audience. if you have a question, research and peer to microphone circulating. 10 minutes before we begin to wrap a. >> my name is -- [inaudible] -- washington d.c. what's missing on discussions is the fact that islamists have nothing to offer except for sharia law and muslims are fed up with the sharia law. the other point is there's a new new generation of arabs that face
, but accurate thomas of abuse in the second panel will tell us the exact same thing that it's moving smoothly and we have no strong need for concerns. but which case he can make her happily. if not, the old adage of the host, paul hervey and now we hear the rest of the story. so with that, we'll start right off as we normally do from the left. from berkeley is a recognized and welcomed me to the panel and you are recognized for five minutes. >> thank you. good afternoon, chairman garrett and members the committee. my name is keith bailey. i am from barclays in that division. i appreciate the opportunity to testify on behalf of the institute of international bankers of the dodd-frank at in its impact on the market. the iab greatly appreciates the hard work done by regulators and congressional committees. we face the cftc in getting this right to operate on such a global basis. a test on a focus on continuing certainty of the type of seven regulations the effect it's having on the risk of the market of the implementation process is not on a more stable footing. they recognize the need for inter
. .. >> his judgment and the aarp's judgment is there's simply not enough time to use military force to respond and make a difference in that situation, but you raise a very good, broader question, and it's certainly something we'll work through with the colleagues and pentagon and elsewhere in the administration. >> mr. chairman, given, again, the potential for unrest across the middle east, i would hope that we follow-up on this specific question because it seems to me to be critical as we look at the situation going forward, and i will just conclude by adding my personal thanks and appreciation to the senator lugar. it's truly been an honor to serve with you, and you leave a tremendous legacy for this committee and for the country. thank you. >> senator, thank you. let me say i just thought a lot about what you said with respect to the availability of teams or forces with respect to emergency extraction, and/or emergency response in various parts of the world, and i think it's something we really need to pay attention to and think about in terms of deployment and preparedness so
are facing now a possible theory of stearate using chemical weapons. they should've been abolished five or 10 years ago if the treaty had been enforced. so it seems to me, go for abolition of these weapons with good, thorough verification. i worked with inf despite the fact that two or three years before we got it, but that would be acceptable. >> rick, your turn. >> as the chairman of the global stearate u.s.a., i have to agree with jack. i won't expound on that. you know, there was no way when i was deeply involved in the issue in the early 80s that i could've foreseen gorbachev. nor could i foreseen the treaty. the zero option when it was propounded was preposterous. i post it. so did the secretary of state. reviewed this and i guess this is the lesson. we view this is largely a challenge and an opportunity and strengthen the alliance. we saw ourselves under threat. the doublecheck decision on deployment of the missiles was part of a broader political military exercise to strengthen the alliance to deal with whatever the next challenge we would face from the soviet union. what i have to sa
. there is only one part that is making us able to compete in the global race. it is being outcompeted by new emerging economy. we asked about the report the government makes for business and enterprise. it is fair to say that his answer has captured the imagination of all political parties that will respond formally in the spring. so here's what we will do now. first, government spending should be alone with the business community. we will provide new money to support the partnerships. from april 2015, the governmental elites one of the funding and get people back to work. the gross funds are having businesses get back into the game. we are going to support businesses and technologies where britain has a clear technology advantage. we will extend our global lead in aerospace and support the supply chain for advanced infection. we've also support british companies to new emerging markets in asia and africa and the americas. and increasing the funding for the uk by over 25% a year. so they can help more firms build the capacity of overseas british chambers and maintain our country's position a
assistance from us, but others as well, very effectively. they use it with great integrity. we do not provide any cash or check transfers, it all goes through international organizations and donor groups that work with the government. .. but our cash payments and checks into the government. we don't do that since it very, very different being. our desires is not to hurt the rwandan people. our desire is not to cut them off from essential support for agricultural education or health programs. in the regional -- >> sanctioning individuals within the rwandan government would not in any way hurt individuals and frankly the argument you are making, i served on this panel and begin my surveys in 1983 in sanctioning south africa. there were people who said he will hurt innocent people if you do so. sometimes the egregious firm is so compelling that a statement needs to be made. minimally we would sanction individuals in the rwandan government. >> mr. chairman, encourager requesting your concerns. >> a day to ask her second pin with a great way to the witness panel beginning with steve ha
protect us from other storms in the future. a while back i was talking with a good friend of mine and i asked her he was doing. his response was, compared to a? it's really a good way to look at how sandy has affected us in delaware compared to our neighbors to the north. we are doing okay. this sandy didn't spare delaware and we have produced beyond our state's ability to provide. from the moment it is clear we are in the storm's path, i've been grateful for the work of governor jack martel and his entire team. state, county, local officials, first responders, american red cross, national guard, many volunteers are hoped to protect the residents as it approached and well after it passed. president obama, fema, the rest of the administration's team working hand in glove with their state team. in this case there was really a team. as i like to say there is no i in the word team. i should have the army corps of engineers has been particular in responding to hurricane sandy. over the years, funded by a series of storm protection projects in maryland are polite, robust and strong, hea
to buses and trains to allow us to get to school and work? i'd rather be well-informed, well trained, well paid her well-traveled than well, married. and i am not alone. according to the office of national statistics, the number of under 20s getting married represents less than half a percent of all marriages in "the sunday times" in the annual number of marriages is at the lowest for over 100 years. someone once said of the state temporary insanity. without sounding too sappy, love doesn't need a cure. love is about marriage. it is marriage that is immoral without love. perhaps we should be focusing on reducing the uk's high divorce rate rather than promoting marriage. the coalition for equal marriage is love is love regardless of gender. well, i would add that love is love regardless of marital status. and while the majority of us, almost all of us absolutely believe in marriage for all his rate and yes, compared to some countries can bush legalize same-sex marriage some years ago, i note that the u.k. has been slow to act. if things are rapidly changing. the huge success of civil partne
to dissuade north korea from launching a missile. although they say for satellite into outer space it's using the same technology that's important, that would be used to launch a nuclear warhead. this type of missile technology is expressly covered under u.n. security council resolutions, prohibiting such testing of missiles and the type of technology, supported by china even. the last time in spring when china tried to launch a satellite, but it failed using this technology, china said we need to come out with a presidential statement from the united nations on this presidential statement condemning the actions of north korea can set the stage for tougher actions in the future if china -- if north korea were to launch another missile. that missile has been launched. we now think it's time for tougher actions since her engaging diplomatically with china and other members of the u.n. security council on tougher resolutions and possibly sanctions against north korea. >> make any progress quick >> if you type to the state department to figure out what's going on. we've conveyed very frankly, can
divided us once and for all is a nation that didn't. the leadership of abraham lincoln and inspiration of so many others in the blood, sweat and tears him i said that it is, we see this republic. we ended slavery. we created an opportunity which still took us years and years to become a reality, reality we are still working for today. so now comes the treaty of the floor. the treaty says what we did 22 years goes the nation is something we are proud to stand behind. it is basically an idea we have created an america that we want to export to the world. as we reflect on this debate and you've heard some of those who opposed it, it's interesting the approach they are taking. they are fearful of change. they are fearful about the expansion of opportunity for the disabled might mean to america. senator kerry has made the point very clearly. this convention, this treaty will not require the united states to change any law. if any changes are made in the future, they will be made with the workings of congress and the president. this convention will not force this change. we meet all of the s
look at the bigger picture, and the substances that are being used by athletes, we talked earlier about the supplement you can buy on the internet and in health food stores that may or may not contain illegal substances. i think a lot of athletes that i talk with who have gotten caught in drug testing, they say that all i did was go to gnc and by a protein powder or a muscle product and i didn't know that it had anabolic steroids and and or whatever it was that broke the rule. i think there is some concern that this is the bigger issue in i think some athletes may be concerned that they are going to do the right thing, but also get caught doing something could be wrong. i think as we look at this, as the pair has been talking about, the issue of unregulated supplements is a huge issue that needs to be addressed. >> that is the can of worms that we don't have time to deal with. but i do want to take another step back. i do not want to diminish the negative impact that these banned substances or any other substance has on our players after they retire. as they are moving forward, i would
school. even more to us, she's an active member of mortgage finance working group, a coalition of housing enhance experts, affordable housing advocates and leading academics the cafÉ regularly to grapple with many challenges in this area. and last but certainly not least on a familiar face, sarah rosen wartell. sir is currently president of the urban and the two, a farmer partly a cofounder of cap as she served for many years as their executive vice president and she's responsible for so much of the work we've done in this housing area. prior to her time at cap, they served as president deputy assistants for economic policy msn adviser to the fha commissioner. she is also an active member of mortgage command working group here moderating our panel today will be nick timiraos of "the wall street journal." previously he covered the 2008 presidential election where he travels at the obama campaign. alter the podium over to you now. >> with everybody take a seat. >> thank you all. i'm really looking forward to our discussion this afternoon. instead of doing opening statements, alaskan of a g
vote early. >> your list of your photo i.d., utility bill, you can use all those things or you can when you are voting early, you write your name, address, date of birth, driver's license number, they will ask for it with your social security number or you can provide one of these 13 additional items in your signature a and a cross check that against the database, and that talks it works in our state. estimates are you voting early at your courthouse or are you voting early in the different areas. >> or the designated area members. >> in west virginia we have early voting in the courthouse and we also have what is called satellite. so, i am trying to figure out how you do that. how you cannot ask for -- >> because you are using the driver's license number or the last digits of the security number and checking that come and before that envelope is opened the check that against the statewide data base where is your signature excess of the electronic file and where all of that information access on the physical copy of it and then that is the same way if you vote by mail you are not we to
and undeniable. it must be something like, you know, it helps us identify someone who is about to set up a nuclear bomb in new york city or something like that. it is very compelling. well, the argument is that if you use racial determination for college admissions, it is likely that there will be somewhat more -- somewhat more of unrehearsed, interracial conversations are in especially among students. under the african-american kids and a latino kids who get these preferences -- they will say something to the white kids and asian kids that have overwhelming compelling educational benefits for them. that is a argument that the university of texas is arguing. that is an exception of non-discrimination that the supreme court has recognized. okay? okay. i think that's ridiculous. and, indeed, the reason the court buys this is because there are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are
strengths in our country that would allow us to make the kind of investment to transform the economy, to do with the reality of stagnant wages and a sense of diminished opportunities. we have strengths. we can do it. we need the public to rain and behavior that's destructive and we need political leaders to act forcefully. given enough to bipartisan commissions and searched enough for bipartisan consensus. for sensible hard all politics along these lines. >> norm, i particularly cutie take the money question. a couple political had a great shared that showed that party polarization in congress was directly correlated with increasing concentrations of wealth from increasing equality went together artisan polarization. and the money question you can handle so many different ways. i'm really concerned about it posed citizens united system with a federal election commission that's completely out of control and with other agencies unable to do anything about it. a lot of money coming in in ways that intimidate political actors until the policy process in a very bad way and the way that will only
a second bite at the apple for bob. >> thank you. we are all familiar with the statistics. the u.s. spends on health care than any other developed country. we hear that continuously. i was surprised to hear at a recent conference exactly the reverse is true when it comes to social support spending for lower income groups. for seniors and people with disabilities. which raises the question in my mind, would it be better for us to try to rebalance our spending in the direction that allow people to stay in their homes, functioning well instead of institutionalizing them. which is very expensive. >> we need to figure out how to spend more sensibly and efficiently in health care no matter what else happens. because it makes no sense. we know that it can be done in a smarter way. the question about how and how much support structures that i will say that most, not all, most of the people who are now institutionalized and long-term care and other settings, they are there because they have multiple dependencies that are difficult to treat. most of the people were who are able to be treated within
the rest of us. >> guest: you know, that was when he was 15 or 16 years old. and you can see some of those characteristics today in his presidency. there are a lot of reasons for that detachment. part of it has to do with hawaii. he was a native hawaiian and you just keep cool. no matter what else is going on. he had not come ridership with his buddies. best of all, you know, just being cool. it was part of his formative years. he has always had that nature. another aspect is more developed and related, i would say, or politics, which is in this country and all of its racial dynamics and explosiveness, a black person was discussed as being very cool. >> host: how much pot smoking did the president do? >> guest: well, there aren't are particulars. you know, the whole notion of bill clinton saying that he never inhaled -- well when jay leno asked the president about it, you know, without going overboard -- my book documented thoroughly. that is what they did. you know, they had a thing called total absorption, but not only did you inhale, but everything in the car as you were smoking it. the
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19